Category Archives: communication

“Great Expectations”

“Great Expectations”

By Laxmi Parmeswar

 I can make winners of some

While devastating few others

How and where do I first come?

Nature, self, Fathers. Mothers?


Look within and nurture me

In others, don’t try to find me

Use me to fulfill your dreams

Don’t give up in rocky streams


My relationship with performance

Sometimes grounded in substance

I can drive many to success

And destroy when in excess


I play a critical role in relationships

Lovers, children, family, friendships

Don’t turn me into an entitlement

It’s a sure path to disappointment


I help when in moderation

Treat me as a supposition

I am a sure possibility

When based in reality


Don’t confuse me with an aspiration

Don’t connect me to your happiness

Just use me as a simple motivation

Don’t blame me for your bleakness


Understand my ability to empower

On a hot day as a soothing shower

I am referred to as “an expectation”

Not a promise, just a calculation!


As Eli Khamarov said, “The best things in life are unexpected- because there were no expectations.”


Practical Communication Tips for Parents

Practical Communication Tips for Parents

By Laxmi Parmeswar

Listening and talking is the key to a healthy connection between you and your children. But parenting is hard work and maintaining a good connection with children can be challenging, especially since parents are dealing with many other pressures.

Here are some tips to consider…

  • Notice times when your children are most likely to talk (at bed time or when you are taking them somewhere, at dinner time, etc.) and then start a conversation.
  • You cannot have an important conversation with your child when the TV is on. Turn the TV and cell phone off.
  • Initiate conversations by sharing what you have been thinking about rather than beginning a conversation with a question.
  • Listen to your children’s point of view even if it is difficult to hear. You don’t need to agree but you must listen and try to understand them.
  • Don’t create a recurring pattern of being too critical of your children. They will tune you out and stop listening to you.
  • Let your child know that you care about what’s happening in their lives. Pay attention to your child’s interests- their favorite music, TV shows, books, their activities, etc.
  • Soften strong reactions; kids will tune you out if you appear angry or defensive.
  • Express your opinion without putting down theirs; acknowledge that it’s okay to disagree.
  • Resist arguing about who is right. Instead say, “I know you disagree with me, but this is what I think.”
  • Focus on your child’s feelings rather than your own during your conversation.
  • Talk to your children–don’t lecture, criticize, threaten, or say hurtful things
  • Kids learn from their own choices. As long as the consequences are not dangerous, don’t feel you have to always step in.
  • Realize your children may test you by telling you a small part of what is bothering them. Listen carefully to what they say, encourage them to talk, and they may share the rest of the story.
  • Ask your children what they may want or need from you in a conversation, such as advice, simply listening, help in dealing with feelings, or help solving a problem.
  • Kids learn by imitating. Most often, they will follow your lead in how they deal with anger, solve problems, and work through difficult feelings.